NetEnt Free Spins

There are many ways that casino sites try to encourage you to sign up with them. They lure you with tempting promotional goodies like free no deposit bonus cash, and free introductory deposit offers.  But perhaps the most often used bait is the “Free Spins” method.

This is where a site encourages you to register and make a real cash deposit by offering you extra free spins on their slots. The free spins awarded will be usually be related to the size of your deposit. Sometimes the offer is a standard amount, but more often it will be in the form of a matching bonus. For example, a site may award you with, say, £10 worth of free spins in return for a £10 real deposit. Sometimes you can use these on any games you like, but more likely you will have to play on one of the site’s promoted games.

Whatever? It’s free right? What’s not to like? Well, you’re right in a sense. The spins really are free, but there are strings attached. Let’s have a look at some of the more common clauses…

The first thing to be aware of is that your free spins will be in the form of “bonus cash”. You can only use this to pay for games on the site, it is never “real” cash as such, and you can never withdraw it. Then you have to take into account the site’s wagering requirements. These state the amount of your own money you have to spend before you can withdraw any winnings. Usually, these are expressed as a multiple of your bonus. 50 x is not uncommon, so if we continue with our example, you may need to wager at least £500 of your own money (50 x £10) before cashing out. There will usually be a time limit within which you have to spend this money too.

In addition, the stated multiple will only apply to play on standard slots. If you decide to wager some cash on premium slots or other casino games such as Poker or Roulette, you will find that not all your spending counts toward this requirement.

Many casinos also impose a winnings cap. This means that any wins derived from your free spins will be limited to, say, £20. Sometimes, the cap is referred to as a maximum conversion rate of, say, 4 x. In our example, you would then only be able to claim £40 (4 x £10) in winnings from your free spins and any surplus would be disregarded.

Many sites also impose a “fair gaming” policy when it comes to free bonuses. This effectively means the bonus is intended for you to try games out at no cost, not for you to actually win the jackpot! Any winnings are therefore paid out at the discretion of the site operator. Now I’m sure we can all appreciate that casino promoters can be very generous people, but perhaps it’s best not to assume you’re going to get a full pay-out if five identical symbols miraculously appear on your winning line!

So all things considered, free spin bonuses are free, and are not to be sniffed at, but only so long as you are aware that there are more strings attached than there are on a typical acoustic guitar. Or maybe even an orchestral harp. In any case, if you are unsure, you always have the right to refuse to accept your bonus. The correct procedure for opting out will vary from site to site, so it may take a bit of tracking down, but you should always be given the option of declining your free spins if you don’t want them.

Always remember to check the precise Terms & Conditions of each site before you accept your free spins. That way, you know where you stand and you won’t be faced with any unexpected surprises.